The Day of the Visit

We discussed how to be prepared for your doctor’s visit in my last post. Today I will discuss what to do on the day of.

First thing is try to be 15-20 mins early. They may need you to fill out new paperwork, or re-run insurance. I know every time I see my Rheumatologist I fill out a health questionnaire.

In the waiting room, find a way to pass the time. Bring a book or read a magazine, or what I like to do, play a game on the phone. I find doing this not only makes the wait time seem shorter but also helps decrease any anxiety I may be feeling about the appointment.

While your waiting in the exam room, take a minute to relax and clear your mind of other distractions. I know sometimes I go in and I am worried about something and work or home. I can’t focus on what my doctor is saying when I’ve got other things on my mind. Get your paperwork and notes ready. Think about what you want to say.

And most importantly, turn the phone on silent and put it away. As a patient and doctor, I find it to be a huge distraction. I will ask something and the phone rings and both of us I lose our train of thought. Plus, it’s simply rude. It gives the doctor the impression you don’t care when you are texting/checking emails/ playing games during your visit. I find they are not paying attention, and I have to repeat myself multiple times.Sometimes I’ve had patients answer their phone and start having full conversations while I’m waiting to finish interviewing/examining them. This is a patient’s special time with a doctor and it should be dedicated solely to determining the best plan of care.

During the visit, let the doctor guide the visit. When I see my doctor, I have my own questions and concerns I want to discuss but I usually wait til the end. I let her ask her questions first, because I know she is trained to gather the important information necessary to coming up with a good assessment and gameplan. Usually throughout the course of her interviewing me, I get my questions answered anyway.

Be honest with your doctor. I’ve had a lot of patients try to hide information because it’s embarrassing, or illegal, or simply cause they did’t feel it was important. Doctors keep everything confidential, and are not there to judge you personally. The more information we have, the more we can help.

Take notes. Write down things so you don’t forget once you get home. I don’t know about you, but somedays it’s a lot of info all at once. Also ask about getting any test result reports you need for your other docs.

Don’t be afraid to voice your questions or concerns. You are your best advocate. Also don’t be afraid to ask for something to be repeated or explained again. Sometimes us doctors talk to fast or accidentally use language that others are not familiar with. I usually ask my patients to repeat the plan back to me, to make sure they really understood what I said. I know I’ve misunderstood what my doctor has said to me a couple times.

I really believe that these doctors visits are really important. With the confusion of this disease, I feel like my doctor and the time I spend with her is what really gets me through. I know a lot of people hate going to the doctor, but I actually look forward to it. All in all, these tips should be useful in making your appointment go smoother.

2 thoughts on “The Day of the Visit

    1. Thank you for the comment! Sometime I feel like what I’m doing isn’t really helping anyone but this gives me reassurance do keep writing and sharing,

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