Tag Archives: Self diagnosis

Self Diagnosis

One of the most frustrating things for a doctor is when a patient walks in handing them the diagnosis they believe they have. They’ve been online and they’ve compared all their symptoms, and they even know what treatment they need. They just need the prescription.Now I am all for patients educating themselves and being proactive about their health, but there are a couple things that are wrong with this situation.

First, not all sources are accurate or up to date. There is a lot of information on the web, some of it is good, some of it is not. Some articles are simply just someone’s opinion and have no study behind it. In truth, as a physician there are only a few sources I trust. I will share that in a later post, as well what a real clinical study is.

The second is that it creates a dangerous bias. The patient becomes so adamant about what they believe is their diagnosis that they are unwilling to hear anything else. So what can happen is the patients start telling their symptoms, guiding their doctor to believe what they think they have. They inadvertently leave out other important details or exaggerate other details. The doctor now has inaccurate information, and sadly sometimes doesn’t dig any deeper because the patient has already handed them a lot of information that does fit a diagnosis.

Take for instance Patient A. She has been having some abdominal pain for the past few days. When she does her search online she notices that her symptoms are similar to those who have gallbladder infection. The pain isn’t quite upper right quadrant but it’s close. She has had some vomiting and diarrhea. She thinks she had a fever but she didn’t really check. She thinks maybe the pain occurs after she eats. She fails to state that her urine has been smelling a little¬†funny and cloudy, and that she has been peeing more frequently because she doesn’t see it as being important for her diagnosis of gallbladder infection. The doctor hears all symptoms leading to gallbladder infection, and treats it as such, missing the diagnosis of kidney infection.

I’m not saying that patients don’t know what’s wrong with them, because truthfully a lot of them do. We know our bodies. ¬†But doctors have years of education, training, and experience that helps them determine your diagnosis. We know what questions to ask, and know what information is important and what information is not.If you are at the doctor’s anyway, might as well let them do their job and take advantage of their knowledge.