Tag Archives: Treatment

Risk vs benefit

It’s no secret that every treatment has a side affect. And sometimes it seems that we end having more treatment just to treat the side effects. It may see logical to just stop the offending drug, but there really is a lot more that goes into determining a treatment plan. Let me explain.

When it ones to determining a patient’s treatment a lot of things come into play. Allergies. Age. Other medical conditions. Medication interaction.Cost. Patient’s lifestyle and ability to be compliant. And then there comes side affects.

As physicians, we have to take into consideration everything to tailor the treatment for each individual. Let me illustrate. I had a 50 yr old African American who came in for a physical. When I looked at his blood pressure it was high. He begged me not to put him on medications, so I agreed that if he really changed his diet and started seriously exercising we could check in a month. A month later, no change. So I started him on a BP medication which studies had shown worked very well in the African American population. He called me a couple days later complaining of allergic reaction. We stopped the medication and I started him on a water pill. When he came in for another BP check, the blood pressure was normal but he complained of having to urinate every hour. He drives a truck for a living, so it was affecting his lifestyle. I sorted through options in my mind- this one isn’t covered by his insurance, this one isn’t good in people who have abnormal kidney function. Eventually we found a good option for him, but it wasn’t easy.

Most medications come with certain warning labels. May cause such and such. Don’t take if. As a physician we have to weigh out the risk and benefit. Is it worth giving a medication that may¬†cause a bad side effect if we know it’s going to save a person’s life?

For instance, a lot of these lupus meds have some pretty bad side effects. Currently I am on a medication which lowered my white blood count and made me very anemic- both fairly dangerous things.Now this medication has been great up until that point. It was controlling my symptoms and it has been protecting my other organs, like my kidneys. I was finally able to get off long term steroids on this medication. The option to put me on a different medication was offered, but since it would involved coming in regularly to sit for a few hours for infusion, I opted out. It would take a toll at work. In the end, we decided to just lower my current dose a little, and keep a closer eye on the bloodwork.

Treatment is a very specialized art, and it involves a very delicate balance. Doctors and patients should work together on this, but at the end of the day you have to ask yourself “Is the risk worth the benefit?”