Tag Archives: Waiting room

The Day of the Visit

We discussed how to be prepared for your doctor’s visit in my last post. Today I will discuss what to do on the day of.

First thing is try to be 15-20 mins early. They may need you to fill out new paperwork, or re-run insurance. I know every time I see my Rheumatologist I fill out a health questionnaire.

In the waiting room, find a way to pass the time. Bring a book or read a magazine, or what I like to do, play a game on the phone. I find doing this not only makes the wait time seem shorter but also helps decrease any anxiety I may be feeling about the appointment.

While your waiting in the exam room, take a minute to relax and clear your mind of other distractions. I know sometimes I go in and I am worried about something and work or home. I can’t focus on what my doctor is saying when I’ve got other things on my mind. Get your paperwork and notes ready. Think about what you want to say.

And most importantly, turn the phone on silent and put it away. As a patient and doctor, I find it to be a huge distraction. I will ask something and the phone rings and both of us I lose our train of thought. Plus, it’s simply rude. It gives the doctor the impression you don’t care when you are texting/checking emails/ playing games during your visit. I find they are not paying attention, and I have to repeat myself multiple times.Sometimes I’ve had patients answer their phone and start having full conversations while I’m waiting to finish interviewing/examining them. This is a patient’s special time with a doctor and it should be dedicated solely to determining the best plan of care.

During the visit, let the doctor guide the visit. When I see my doctor, I have my own questions and concerns I want to discuss but I usually wait til the end. I let her ask her questions first, because I know she is trained to gather the important information necessary to coming up with a good assessment and gameplan. Usually throughout the course of her interviewing me, I get my questions answered anyway.

Be honest with your doctor. I’ve had a lot of patients try to hide information because it’s embarrassing, or illegal, or simply cause they did’t feel it was important. Doctors keep everything confidential, and are not there to judge you personally. The more information we have, the more we can help.

Take notes. Write down things so you don’t forget once you get home. I don’t know about you, but somedays it’s a lot of info all at once. Also ask about getting any test result reports you need for your other docs.

Don’t be afraid to voice your questions or concerns. You are your best advocate. Also don’t be afraid to ask for something to be repeated or explained again. Sometimes us doctors talk to fast or accidentally use language that others are not familiar with. I usually ask my patients to repeat the plan back to me, to make sure they really understood what I said. I know I’ve misunderstood what my doctor has said to me a couple times.

I really believe that these doctors visits are really important. With the confusion of this disease, I feel like my doctor and the time I spend with her is what really gets me through. I know a lot of people hate going to the doctor, but I actually look forward to it. All in all, these tips should be useful in making your appointment go smoother.

Misunderstanding

The other day, at the office, a receptionist told me a story about her recent emergency room visit. She was having a migraine, and when she came into her room, they asked for a urine sample. She had just used the restroom, and told them that she would be unable to give a sample. They told her they would not be able to give her any medication without the urine sample. She was so angry that she left and went to a different ER.

At the different ER, she was eventually treated and given a prescription for her regular migraine medication. She complained that every time she sees her neurologist, he only gives her seven pills. She understood that insurance would only pay for that amount, but she felt if he wrote for more, then she would just pay out of pocket for the extra. She gets more than seven migraines a month.

I explained to her that in the ER they took her urine to test for pregnancy. A lot of medications cannot be used in pregnancy, and tests such as CT scans can cause radiation and affect a growing fetus. She argued that she told them she was menstruating, to which I replied that sometimes women can have  bleeding that resemble their periods even while being pregnant.

I also explained that when pain is involved, sometimes they need to do drug screening to make sure the patient is not using recreational drugs, or abusing prescription medications. I told her that doctors have become suspicious when patients aren’t willing to give a urine sample because many drug-seekers use this tactic to avoid getting caught and obtain pain medications for recreational habit or to sell.

I then explained that the reason she only gets seven migraine pills is because it is an as needed medication to be taken only when she has a migraine. It is a quick onset medication to be used when the migraine symptoms begin so it will not worsen. If she is having such frequent migraines, it may mean that she needs to be on a daily medication to prevent migraines.

She agreed to see her neurologist, and that’s when I realized so much of the discord between doctors and patients is due to simple misunderstanding. By simply educating patients, we can empower them. So in an attempt to keep the air clear, I’d like to answer any general questions you may have. Send me your questions, and I will post them with my answer. Here’s your chance to “Ask the Doc”

Please keep in mind that I cannot offer medical treatment advice.

The Waiting Room

I read a post on Facebook, where someone was complaining that they were in their doctor’s office and the doctor was seven minutes late for her appointment. Hearing these type of things really frustrate me. I’ve been on my fair end of long wait times, and believe me I know it sucks, but I promise you it’s just as bad on the other side. Chances are if the doctor is late for your appointment, then she is running behind in general, which ultimately means she’s going to be staying way late to finish everything up.

I understand as a patient what the waiting room feels like, and I encourage other doctors to understand too. Sitting in a waiting room can be a very anxiety-provoking experience. You’re concerned about what the doctor is going to say about your test results, or that she’s going to be upset at you for not taking your meds for the past couple days because you ran out. You’re scared that you won’t be able to express yourself or have enough time for all your questions. You may also be worried that you have to go pick up the kids, or make it to the bank, or that time is running out on your meter.

And then on top of all that stress you are sick. Your exhausted and your body hurts. The only thing you want to be doing is laying in bed, and truthfully it’s what your body should be doing. And maybe you’re hungry. God knows what happens to me when I’m “hangry”. I get dizzy, and my head hurts, and I turn into Oscar the Grouch. You need to be home, but instead you are in the office waiting for what feels like hours.

Doctors don’t like keeping patients waiting, but it happens. Maybe the patient before you came in late, or perhaps someone walked in because they were sick. Or maybe someone had a fifteen minute appointment, but it ran a little long because they had a lot of issues. Sometimes it’s a scheduling issue. Someone from another department accidentally double booked, or even worse, the administration requires time slots to be double-booked. Other times we have a serious emergency where we have a patient who needs to be transferred to the ER. We’ll have to fill out transfer paperwork, update the medication and medical history lists, provide emergent treatment, and keep an eye on the patient til EMS arrives. Sometimes it’s a phone call from another doctor or family member about a patient in the hospital. I remember being locked up in my office on a twenty minute phone call like this, and when I came in to see my next patient, she accused me of sitting around on my computer in my office doing nothing.

For my patient readers, I ask you to be understanding with your doctors. It’s not an easy job, and the truth is when you are the patient who has the emergency or special situation we will give you all the time you need. And for my physician readers, we have to respect our patient’s time as well, keep them in the loop so they don’t feel forgotten,and be considerate of what they are feeling as they wait.